Ancient Greek Hairstyles

by:Canway     2020-09-08
Ever since the beginning of civilization, men and particularly women have been paying a lot of attention to the way their hair is done. Women obviously have been always more overprotective about their hair, because well-kept hair are a part of the concept of good looks, adornment and pleasant appearance. Even in the times as far back in history as the Greek civilization, people have paid attention to beauty and personal hygiene. The most ancient of hairstyles were a result of the use of knives, hairpins and combs. As time passed, women started using hair additions and artistic wigs. In fact, ancient women were all considered more attractive if their hair were long as well as thick. It was believed that the length and thickness of hair lent it greater beauty and added on to a woman's appearance. The hairstyles of ancient Greeks were unique in more ways than one. The most popular hairstyle was the 'Green Knot'. For this particular style, the ancient Greek women used to hold their hair together and formed a knot at the neck. Ever since those times, buns and knots have always been in fashion, with novel variations. Ancient Greeks also made use of saffron to lighten the color of their hair, so as to further enhance the style. Ancient Rome for much of its time had been a society of copycats, where the norm was to follow the lead of the Greek fashions. Some Roman styles saw women dying their hair blond or wearing wigs made from the hair of slaves that had been captured. Beauty salons in Rome began to make hairstyles more ornate and elaborate, to the point that hair was often styled around wire frames that women wore on their heads. The upper classes were tended to by slave cosmetologists and there emerged many beauty salons and barber shops for different classes to frequent. In the Middle East, hair was traditionally hidden completely when out in public, although men would go to salon bathhouses and wash their long hair in a henna rinse, compliments of the local salon stylist. As the spoils of military conquest became greater, more sophisticated stones became available, including pearls, diamonds, sapphires, and emeralds. This luxury in jewels corresponded to the periods of Roman commercial expansion during the last two centuries BC and the first two of the Christian era. Although Rome was then an important manufacturing centre, Antioch and Alexandria rivalled her in the execution of fashion accessories in the Oriental taste. Gradually Roman artisans introduced not only their filigree and granulation techniques and their decorative motifs, but also their habit of piling on precious stones. The tendency towards luxury became more marked in the third and fourth centuries AD, with a predominance of Syrian styles represented by large gems. This translated into heavy pendants, ear-rings or crotalia, and bracelets developed into multiple convolutions. The pero was a light boot made of raw, natural hide. It reached to the calf and laced all its length. The pero was worn in the country. In the house, Romans wore sandals, either the solea, whose sole was fastened on by cords over the instep, or the crepida, which were leather espadrilles held on by a strap passing through eyelets, with a wide range of fastenings. Women wore the soccus, a s richly decorated slipper, or the calceoli, a term which seems to have been applied specially to shoes worn in the house. The upper of women's shoes was not divided into two pieces, as was usual for men's footwear, and women's shoes were made in red, green or yellow as well as white. During the 15th century, the time of the Renaissance saw one of the most painful hair trends ever to hit beauty salons. Women during this era would not only pluck their eyebrows, but would pluck the entire front hairline that ran across their head in order to make it look like they had higher foreheads! Obviously the old saying Beauty is Pain rang loud and clear to women back then, too. This crazy era was followed by women rushing to beauty salons for white face powder and red wigs, in order to keep up with the fashion trends that had been set by Queen Elizabeth with her super pale complexion and bright red hair. There was also a period in Greek history, when the focus from the hairstyles went into hibernation. Even the use of wigs became less common. Later, however, with the advancement in technology an ever-increasing number of men and women started going to the hairdressers, in order to bring an absolutely new look to their personality, via the hairstyle route. The 'comparatively modern' of the ancient Greek hairstyles included 'crimping' a style in which waves were produced in the hair, using a hot iron. Such a style was in vogue for a long time in ancient Greece. Even in the present times, crimping is the most chosen hairstyle for young girls, especially if they desire a unique look of Greek hairstyles
Custom message
Chat Online 编辑模式下无法使用
Chat Online inputting...